Esquire Theme by Matthew Buchanan
Social icons by Tim van Damme

21

Oct

I hung out with this girl last night

And other than the fact I didn’t sleep well because I almost got caught for smoking, I had a great day.

So, this guy comes in my room from the offices, says someone’s been smoking, and he enters my room, and me not unable to be even smelling anything, think I’m totally fucked. He checks, checks the other rooms, and then o ask him is everything good, and he says yes. And then I ask his name again, thank him, leave, and then go in my room and realize I left my window open. And had my fan on. So I was just like so elated it wasn’t me.

And then this girl J came over, we first we’re just playing Pokemon, then my roommate was getting drunk and loud, and then we left to go get the shiny gengar for our Pokemon games. The guy at the counter was there when I was last time, and he gave me one cause he saw me before, and then J just looked at him like, “uh can I fucking get one too?

I felt bad about that. But we then went to her place, played some more, I offered to cook, we went back to my place, then we did the old michigan thing and took bottles back, and then hung out at her place for a little while longer watching 13 going on 30 which she loves, and then I went home at midnight. From 3 to 12 I hung out with her, and not a hiccup of a problem anywhere.

I would be an idiot if I ignored the fact that that was a lot of fun, and like I really want to hang out with her again.

Which I am tonight because holy crap we have a Pokemon club!

It’s gonna be May.
I mean a great day.

To all you chasers out there hoping I’ll post some questionable content

Go fuck yourself
I will not release anything until you all FYCKING unfollow me you gross as fucks

20

Oct

19

Oct

flamesfirstfrost:

asapscience:

The Midnight Planétarium watch not only tells time, but follows the orbit of our solar system’s planets. 

*breathes heavily into a paperbag*

flamesfirstfrost:

asapscience:

The Midnight Planétarium watch not only tells time, but follows the orbit of our solar system’s planets. 

*breathes heavily into a paperbag*

livingpursuit:

Home in Warsaw, Poland | Studio O. Organic Design

livingpursuit:

Home in Warsaw, Poland | Studio O. Organic Design

18

Oct

Bergman och Fårö // Marie Nyreröd, 2004

(Source: mexq)

I think, I spent a lot of time, doing a lot, and being involved with a lot of people, and I never really spent time with myself, or figured out who I was, or what I wanted.

I saw a girl twice this week, and just wasn’t feeling connected with her. I’m meeting another girl (both from online) on monday.

So, It’ll throw all this gender shit into the mix.
but Also, and maybe a little reminder, i’ve riffed on it before;
I think, above all else, you have to have compatible personalities.
And there are just some people who aren’t at all like me, and it’s unfortunate that, well, i suppose it’s funny to notice the irony, after being on the other side of a relationship, and not really understanding that concept.

it’s funny in a “oh so that’s how the other person felt” kinda moment of realization. not like I’m laughing at it because that’s sorta duckling sad and all, but, funny as in a lamented laughter sorta way.

anyways, I think I’m starting to tap into who I am and what I really want in life. I think holding a job and just, you know, living, not really working on like huge projects (like in scouts) will be able to keep me, busy.

that, and one day building instruments from my bare hands. that’ll be a fun one.

like, I have always wanted to build a piano out of my own bare hands.

to make all those cuts, to make all of these things happen, it’d be fun.

of course I’m going to start on a guitar first to make sure It can actually be done, but either way I’m going to like those kinds of projects, the ones I can make with my own money, on my own time, those kinda things.

I think that’s why I stick with things here and there, to get to doing the things I actually want to do.

shh, don’t tell anyone my motives.

but, it’s just something in a sort of a hobby, a fun thing to do to pass the time.

there are definitely people who are totally full of themselves, and whether or not you could ever get them to admit it, I think that some of these people totally thrive off acknowledgement of others. and, like I’ll see these people around campus, and, like, they’re the people who really need the attention, like music major kids, and Instead of being totally hooked into their conversation, I’ll like just derail them with something trivial and useless like: oh hey, I finally got this pokemon I have wanted to get for so long, here check it out” and I hope that in some way, I’m ruining that other person to my level, and then one day, I an just go: “Yes, bastard, it was ALL ON PURPOSE now stop being full of yourself and enjoy other peoples successes, no matter how small” and then walk away, the dealer of life lessons

kay-is-for-kookie:

interactyouth:

The following intersex FAQ was compiled by the members of Inter/Act. It is intended to be a living document that we will continue to tweak, change, add-to and subtract from. Please feel free to reference it, re-blog it, and ask us questions (on tumblr or at inter.act@aiclegal.org)
What is intersex?
Intersex is an umbrella term that describes people born with intersex conditions or DSD (Differences of Sex Development). There are over 30 different conditions that cause intersex people to have physical differences inside and/or outside their bodies, making their sex neither purely male or female. Biology class has always taught us that sex is merely black and white, “male” or “female,” but now we know that’s not true. There are a lot of awesome gray areas in the middle!
What are some intersex conditions?
There are over many conditions that fall under the intersex umbrella including, but not limited to: Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS), Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia, Klinefelter Syndrome, Hypospadias, Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKH), Swyer Syndrome, Turner Syndrome, 5-Alpha Reductase Deficiency. Please see the ISNA (Intersex Society of North America) website for more information on specific conditions.
How common are intersex people?
Intersex people are about 1-2% of the population, or 1 in every 2,000 people. That’s as common as natural born redheads! We’re not rare, just invisible.
So how come I’ve never heard of intersex before?
The intersex community has a long history of shame and secrecy, for so many reasons. For starters, many doctors have told patients that they’ll never meet anyone like themselves. Sometimes they’ll even tell them not to talk about their conditions to anyone! On top of that, doctors and parents often try to “fix” intersex kid’s bodies with unnecessary surgeries, trying to make them fit into their idea of “normal.” Not to mention each condition is different, so educating the general public is hard when there is so much information to talk about.
It sounds like intersex conditions can be hard to care for!
They can be. Finding a good doctor that you can really connect with is so important for intersex people. Sometimes doctors don’t know the best way to handle each specific person. We all need to be informed about our bodies, our options, and the research that’s been done so we can make the best decisions possible. Making an informed decision is the most important thing an intersex person can do, so please don’t rush into anything. 
How does gender fit into intersex?
Not quite as simply as you might think! Intersex relates to biological sex and a person’s genetic traits, internal and external reproductive organs, hormones, and secondary sex characteristics. Gender is more about the way somebody feels or identifies. This means intersex individuals identify as female, male, man, woman, or a multitude of identities just as non-intersex individuals do. Some examples include genderqueer, agender, third gender, two-spirit, and the list doesn’t end there.  It’s important to remember that gender is fluid, not stagnant, possibly alternating its course during a person’s journey 
How does intersex differ from transgender?
Intersex is often confused with transgender, but they are actually very different things. Intersex is when your biological sex doesn’t neatly fit into the male/female binary, but transgender is when you feel as if your assigned sex does not match your gender identity. Someone can be both intersex and transgender!
What terms can I use to talk about intersex people?
Intersex and DSD are the two current terms that most people use interchangeably. However, they both are controversial for different people.  Some of our youth feel more comfortable with DSD as it might be the only term they are familiar with, while others prefer intersex over DSD. All intersex folks have the right to self define themselves at any particular point in their journey. It’s better for people to come to their own conclusions about how they want to identify, rather than be told or pushed into identifying a certain way. If you don’t know how someone identifies, feel free to ask!
Can I use the word hermaphrodite?
No. Hermaphrodite is a harmful term that is widely considered a slur, please don’t use it. It’s a stigmatizing word that people associate with having both sets of working genetalia, which is rarely possible in humans, if at all. Some intersex folk have started reclaiming the term, but that is for them to decide and use, not for you. 
What are some other terms I should know?
Ambiguous Genitalia - Genitalia that doesn’t look clearly “male” or “female.” However, no genitals look the same, and nobody’s genitalia is “ambiguous.” It’s all just genitals!
Dyadic - Some intersex people have started using dyadic to describe those who are not intersex (meaning, they fit the “male” or “female” binary)
Cisgender- When a person’s gender identity matches their assigned sex. For example, a person assigned female at birth and identifies as a woman is considered cisgender. This term can get confusing with intersex individuals - some use it, some don’t.
HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy)  - This is an important tool in an intersex person’s tool box. HRT ensures that an intersex person’s physical and emotional health needs are properly maintained. If someone’s hormone needs (for things like development, body regulation, or bone growth) aren’t being met, they may go on HRT to figure out the best hormone levels for their bodies.
Informed Consent - This term gets thrown a lot, especially when talking about surgeries of intersex people. Basically, it means that nobody should be operated on without their full knowledge of circumstances, repercussions, reasoning, etc. For example, babies and children are too young to fully understand and give informed consent.
Preferred Pronouns - Many people (intersex or otherwise) don’t identify as a binary gender, especially when their bodies don’t line up in a typical binary box. Ask someone what their preferred gender pronoun is. They’ll love you for it!
What are some other intersex resources?
We have an ever-growing list of resources on our page. Please check there for more information on support groups or legal help.
What can you do as an ally?
Call out others when they say harmful things. Be our advocates where you can, but also give us a chance to educate. Don’t speak over an intersex person, as chances are we’re a lot more familiar with these issues than you are. Listen and try to understand our stories, as we’re pretty incredible people. :)

Some additional thoughts about the So how come I’ve never heard of intersex before? section:
In addition to the shame and secrecy mentioned, in some cases in the past (I don’t know if this is still happening, I hope it’s not) doctors know about intersex conditions, and maybe even “fix” them, but don’t tell the parents for one reason or another. It’s also worth noting that for many people without visible intersex conditions (and even some with), these aren’t “diagnosed” until later in life. Some intersex people are also lumped in as trans by their doctors, even though that’s not necessarily the right way to approach it for everyone.
Also, many (not all!) intersex people do not consider it a medical condition or disorder, but rather see it as being along the spectrum of sex. This is why some people prefer intersex, while some people prefer DSD.
On the gender identity section, don’t forget about intergender! This is a nonbinary gender identity intended specifically for intersex people! (I remember hearing this was coined by indonintersex but I may be wrong? You can also find it mentioned in the actuallyintersex FAQs.)

kay-is-for-kookie:

interactyouth:

The following intersex FAQ was compiled by the members of Inter/Act. It is intended to be a living document that we will continue to tweak, change, add-to and subtract from. Please feel free to reference it, re-blog it, and ask us questions (on tumblr or at inter.act@aiclegal.org)

What is intersex?

Intersex is an umbrella term that describes people born with intersex conditions or DSD (Differences of Sex Development). There are over 30 different conditions that cause intersex people to have physical differences inside and/or outside their bodies, making their sex neither purely male or female. Biology class has always taught us that sex is merely black and white, “male” or “female,” but now we know that’s not true. There are a lot of awesome gray areas in the middle!

What are some intersex conditions?

There are over many conditions that fall under the intersex umbrella including, but not limited to: Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS), Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia, Klinefelter Syndrome, Hypospadias, Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKH), Swyer Syndrome, Turner Syndrome, 5-Alpha Reductase Deficiency. Please see the ISNA (Intersex Society of North America) website for more information on specific conditions.

How common are intersex people?

Intersex people are about 1-2% of the population, or 1 in every 2,000 people. That’s as common as natural born redheads! We’re not rare, just invisible.

So how come I’ve never heard of intersex before?

The intersex community has a long history of shame and secrecy, for so many reasons. For starters, many doctors have told patients that they’ll never meet anyone like themselves. Sometimes they’ll even tell them not to talk about their conditions to anyone! On top of that, doctors and parents often try to “fix” intersex kid’s bodies with unnecessary surgeries, trying to make them fit into their idea of “normal.” Not to mention each condition is different, so educating the general public is hard when there is so much information to talk about.

It sounds like intersex conditions can be hard to care for!

They can be. Finding a good doctor that you can really connect with is so important for intersex people. Sometimes doctors don’t know the best way to handle each specific person. We all need to be informed about our bodies, our options, and the research that’s been done so we can make the best decisions possible. Making an informed decision is the most important thing an intersex person can do, so please don’t rush into anything.

How does gender fit into intersex?

Not quite as simply as you might think! Intersex relates to biological sex and a person’s genetic traits, internal and external reproductive organs, hormones, and secondary sex characteristics. Gender is more about the way somebody feels or identifies. This means intersex individuals identify as female, male, man, woman, or a multitude of identities just as non-intersex individuals do. Some examples include genderqueer, agender, third gender, two-spirit, and the list doesn’t end there.  It’s important to remember that gender is fluid, not stagnant, possibly alternating its course during a person’s journey

How does intersex differ from transgender?

Intersex is often confused with transgender, but they are actually very different things. Intersex is when your biological sex doesn’t neatly fit into the male/female binary, but transgender is when you feel as if your assigned sex does not match your gender identity. Someone can be both intersex and transgender!

What terms can I use to talk about intersex people?

Intersex and DSD are the two current terms that most people use interchangeably. However, they both are controversial for different people.  Some of our youth feel more comfortable with DSD as it might be the only term they are familiar with, while others prefer intersex over DSD. All intersex folks have the right to self define themselves at any particular point in their journey. It’s better for people to come to their own conclusions about how they want to identify, rather than be told or pushed into identifying a certain way. If you don’t know how someone identifies, feel free to ask!

Can I use the word hermaphrodite?

No. Hermaphrodite is a harmful term that is widely considered a slur, please don’t use it. It’s a stigmatizing word that people associate with having both sets of working genetalia, which is rarely possible in humans, if at all. Some intersex folk have started reclaiming the term, but that is for them to decide and use, not for you.

What are some other terms I should know?

Ambiguous Genitalia - Genitalia that doesn’t look clearly “male” or “female.” However, no genitals look the same, and nobody’s genitalia is “ambiguous.” It’s all just genitals!

Dyadic - Some intersex people have started using dyadic to describe those who are not intersex (meaning, they fit the “male” or “female” binary)

Cisgender- When a person’s gender identity matches their assigned sex. For example, a person assigned female at birth and identifies as a woman is considered cisgender. This term can get confusing with intersex individuals - some use it, some don’t.

HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy)  - This is an important tool in an intersex person’s tool box. HRT ensures that an intersex person’s physical and emotional health needs are properly maintained. If someone’s hormone needs (for things like development, body regulation, or bone growth) aren’t being met, they may go on HRT to figure out the best hormone levels for their bodies.

Informed Consent - This term gets thrown a lot, especially when talking about surgeries of intersex people. Basically, it means that nobody should be operated on without their full knowledge of circumstances, repercussions, reasoning, etc. For example, babies and children are too young to fully understand and give informed consent.

Preferred Pronouns - Many people (intersex or otherwise) don’t identify as a binary gender, especially when their bodies don’t line up in a typical binary box. Ask someone what their preferred gender pronoun is. They’ll love you for it!

What are some other intersex resources?

We have an ever-growing list of resources on our page. Please check there for more information on support groups or legal help.

What can you do as an ally?

Call out others when they say harmful things. Be our advocates where you can, but also give us a chance to educate. Don’t speak over an intersex person, as chances are we’re a lot more familiar with these issues than you are. Listen and try to understand our stories, as we’re pretty incredible people. :)

Some additional thoughts about the So how come I’ve never heard of intersex before? section:

In addition to the shame and secrecy mentioned, in some cases in the past (I don’t know if this is still happening, I hope it’s not) doctors know about intersex conditions, and maybe even “fix” them, but don’t tell the parents for one reason or another. It’s also worth noting that for many people without visible intersex conditions (and even some with), these aren’t “diagnosed” until later in life. Some intersex people are also lumped in as trans by their doctors, even though that’s not necessarily the right way to approach it for everyone.

Also, many (not all!) intersex people do not consider it a medical condition or disorder, but rather see it as being along the spectrum of sex. This is why some people prefer intersex, while some people prefer DSD.

On the gender identity section, don’t forget about intergender! This is a nonbinary gender identity intended specifically for intersex people! (I remember hearing this was coined by indonintersex but I may be wrong? You can also find it mentioned in the actuallyintersex FAQs.)

16

Oct

Step 295: Print this out for your laundry room

15

Oct